J Cosmet Med 2019; 3(2): 55-63  https://doi.org/10.25056/JCM.2019.3.2.55
Picosecond laser treatment for Asian skin pigments: a review
Tin Hau Sky Wong, MBBS, MRCSEd, MScPD, MScAPS1,2
1Leciel Medical Centre, Hong Kong
2Medaes Medical Clinic, Hong Kong
Tin Hau Sky Wong
E-mail: drskywong@gmail.com
Received: November 6, 2019; Accepted: December 9, 2019; Published online: December 31, 2019.
© Korean Society of Korean Cosmetic Surgery. All rights reserved.

cc This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Picosecond (PS) laser is a novel dermatological laser technology that is useful in treating various cutaneous benign pigmentary disorders (BPDs), including freckles, solar lentigines, melasma, Hori macule, nevus of Ota, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, and tattoo. Treating Asian BPDs can be troublesome as Asian skin is typically associated with a high incidence of laser complications, such as burns, hyperpigmentation/hypopigmentation, and textural changes, which can result in various cosmetic and even psychosocial problems. This study aimed to describe the PS laser treatment for common Asian BPDs compared with traditional laser treatments. Peer-reviewed articles published from 1965 to 2018 were identified from PubMed and Google Scholar, and qualitatively reviewed with respect to the treatment of Asian BPDs. PS lasers achieved greater effectiveness and potentially fewer complications in the treatment of Asian BPDs through breakthrough mechanisms including photomechanical effects and laser-induced optical breakdown. PS laser is especially suitable and effective for treating various BPDs in Asian skin.
Keywords: freckles; Hori macule; melasma; nevus of Ota; picosecond laser; tattoo
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